2022 A Year in Review Part II: July to December

July began where June had left off, with Canadians across the political spectrum furious at being unable to access basic government services. Ideology aside, the Trudeau Liberals were failing to perform the most basic functions of government. Their decision to hire thousands of new bureaucrats has led to a scenario that continues today: more government employees working longer hours and achieving less than the public service was producing prior to COVID. Conservatives offered a list of helpful suggestions to improve service, but as usual, our commonsense solutions fell on deaf ears.
July also saw the largest service outage in Canadian history as Rogers dealt with a “system glitch.”
As Canadians struggled, Mr. Trudeau spent most of July in the air. He attended the G7 and NATO summits, and the Papal visit, but most of July’s travel was not government business but rather fundraisers (four) and photo-ops. Then he took off on vacation. For most people, traveling to another province or country to check out local points of interest, attend special events, and take pictures is called a vacation. After racking up roughly 26,000 km on the taxpayer’s dime (and burning roughly 120 tonnes of CO2) to raise money and take pictures only served to solidify the perception of our Prime Minister as entitled, hypocritical, and out of touch with Canadians.
Summer also saw intensified calls from Canadians to scrap the useless ArriveCan app.
It was also during August that the Director of the Canadian Institute for Inclusion and Citizenship called the Liberal Government’s MAID law the biggest existential threat to disabled people—we could add the elderly, the poor, children, the mentally ill, and (according to recent reports) veterans—since Hitler’s Nazi Germany. Conservatives continue to push for a halt to the Trudeau Government’s increasingly permissive MAID legislation.
In September, Canadians bid a sad but fond farewell to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. For many (myself included) Her Majesty was the only Monarch they had ever known in their lifetime. Her example and the sense of constancy and calm she provided will be sorely missed.
September did bring one positive, and that was the landslide election of the Hon. Pierre Poilievre as leader of the CPC. Pierre ran a great campaign, connecting with Canadians who have been left behind by this government. Conservatives are energized and united, and ready to win the next election.
The fall brought intensified calls to deal with the growing cost of living crisis. Reckless Liberal borrowing and spending was driving inflation to record rates, and Canadians were (and remain) struggling to make ends meet. The Liberal Government’s tone-deaf comments about how they had made Canadians “better off” or how Liberal Finance Minister, Chrystia Freeland was going to cancel her Disney Plus subscription just served to further prove that this Liberal Government is out of touch and Canadians are out of money.
November saw a return of the freedom convoy as the Emergencies Act Inquiry was convened. Canadians look forward to the results of February’s report, though no one is holding their breath that it will do anything more than confirm what most Canadians already know: whether they agreed with the truckers or not, the threshold for the act was never met, and the Liberal government misled the Canadian people.
December brought a fresh attack on gun owners as the Liberal Government broke their word and added hunting rifles and shotguns to their list of banned weapons. Rather than go after illegal guns, smuggled from the US, this Liberal Government continues to target law-abiding Canadians.
There’s so much more we could say about 2022, but I think most of us would rather put this long bleak year behind us.
The beauty of a New Year is a fresh start and fresh possibilities. While the players remain the same, I truly believe Canadians are coming out of a long cold dark winter.
It is my hope that 2023 is the year we finally send Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Government packing. That a new Conservative Government begins the long slow process of cleaning up Liberal messes and helping Canadians who have been left behind to finally get ahead. Of restoring common sense and a government that serves all Canadians.
As your Member of Parliament, my pledge for 2023 remains what it has always been: to serve Provencher. To boldly be a voice for Provencher views and values in Ottawa and offer common-sense solutions. To represent you and your family and help build the Canada we all want to see, for ourselves and for our children.